Lengthening a cropped jumper pattern

 

My most recent make was a full length jumper but I used the Chuck pattern by Andi Sattterlund which is for a cropped jumper. I really loved the style of this pattern but knew I wouldn’t get much wear from a cropped jumper as it does not really fit in with my style and the other clothes I wear. Despite this only being my second cardigan/jumper (here’s my first!)I decided to give it a try. Here’s how I went about it.

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Firstly I rechecked my gauge – as the back of the jumper was stocking stitch I measured a 10 cm square and counted the number of rows and stitches in this square. I also checked the length of the cable repeat as this may have affected the gauge slightly. Once I had these measurements I could work out how many additional rows I would need to add any given length to the bodice and also how many increase I would have to do on each row to add any additional circumference.

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I decided it would be best to increase the length by one full cable repeat so as to keep the design as true to the original as possible.

Next I measured myself both at the point where the jumper currently finished (A) and at the point where the lengthened version would finish (B) given an additional length of one cable repeat.

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The next step was to compare my measurement (A) at the current finishing point of the jumper to that at the same point on the schematic. It turns out my measurement (A) was 25% larger than that of the schematic. So, I reduced my measurement (B) by 25% to give the equivalent diameter for the schematic.

The difference between these two schematic measurement tells me how much diameter I need to add to the jumper . I then multiplied this by my stitch gauge to figure out how many additional stitches were required to increase the circumference from what it is now to the final circumference at the new length.

As I wanted to keep to the spirit of the original pattern I decided to increase in the same places as the decreases had been to get from the chest to bust measurement – this required increases in 4 places per row. So I divided the total amount of stitch increases required by 4 to tell me how many of the added rows would require increases. I then spread these evenly across the cable repeat to create a smooth gradient from the waist to the hips.

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HOW to do it yourself

Step 1: Measure your gauge – How many stitches do you have in 10 cm? How many rows?

Step 2: Divide these numbers by 10. This will tell you how many stitches and rows you have in 1 cm (I will call these your stitch and row gauge)

Step 3: How much length do you want to add to your jumper? Multiply this measurement (in cm) by your row guage. This is how many rows you will add to your pattern.

Step 4: Try on your cropped jumper. Measure your circumference at the current finishing point (This is your waist measurement)

Step 5: Measure your circumference at the length your jumper will be with the additional rows (This is the new circumference)

Step 6: Compare your waist measurement to the schematic on the pattern. The percentage difference between these two is your ease measurement.

Step 7: Reduce your new circumference by the same percentage ease. This is your final jumper circumference

Step 8. Subtract the schematic measurement from your final jumper circumference to give the increased diameter required

Step 9: Multiply this value by your stitch gauge to tell you haw many stitches you need to add

Step 10: Decide how many stitches you wish to add per row – this will often be 4 (2 on each side)

Step 11: Divide the number of stitches you need to add by the number you want to add per row to tell you how many rows need to have increases.

Step 12: Continue to knit your pattern increasing the correct number of times (determined in step 11) evenly across the additional rows.

I hope this helps. Has anyone else had to change a pattern before? I’d love to know what you did and why?

You can find out more about how I increased the length of this jumper including a worked example with my measurements on my Ravelry project page

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5 thoughts on “Lengthening a cropped jumper pattern

  1. Becca says:

    Thanks for sharing the step by step! I do a fair amount of modifying patterns too. I always have to lengthen the sleeves of sweater because they are never as long as I like!

    Liked by 1 person

    • Helen from H's Handcrafts says:

      Glad it is useful. For the sleeves on this I just carried on decreasing in the same pattern (2decreases every 6 rows) until they were the length I wanted. It helps that this jumper was knit top down so I could try on as I went along.
      The only other hint I have come across if lengthening sleeves that were previously above the elbow to be longer is to add approx 1 inch more than the length you measure for your sleeve. This is to give room for the sleeve to scrunch up where you bend your elbow.
      Hope this helps!
      H.

      Like

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