Tag Archives: Blue

Fibre Mood Mira Dress

Hey Everyone, it seems like all I have shared for quite a while now is free t-shirt patterns so I thought it was time to share a “proper” make with you! The Mira dress by Fibre Mood is a little bit outside of my usual style but I have loved every single one that I have seen pop up on my Instagram feed so I thought that perhaps I should give it a try. I have actually been put off woven garments for a while as I always struggle with the fit and it seemed like so much effort to get it just right compared to knits.

For the past few months, I have been taking part in “Elevate your Sewing” an online sewing membership run by CL Hardie aka The Thrifty Stitcher. The Zoom classes together with the encouragement of all the lovely members have really given me a confidence boost in finding a good fit and mastering a number of sewing techniques. In the three months that I have been a member I have already seen an improvement in my sewing but especially in my confidence to diagnose and fix fit issues with my handmade garments.

Despite the flouncy style not being in my usual wardrobe repertoire I really like the shape. I have always struggled with summer clothes – I don’t like anything too short or strappy, but get too hot in my go-to jeans and t-shirts so this easy breezy dress looked like it might just fit the bill. I had 6 metres of viscose twill from Pound fabrics (3m in a green/black camo (ish) print and 3m of a plain bright blue) so I had plenty fabric to play with to get the fit just right. I do love my final garment but it certainly wasn’t easy sailing to get there. Read on to find out all the alterations I had to make (WARNING: Its a long one so strap in!).

 

 

if you are just here for the pretty pictures …keep scrolling for some more of this beautiful dress

Version 1: Top length in green/black twill

Based on my measurements I opted for the size 38 and added a 1/2inch FBA (1″ total increase). This is a fairly standard adjustment for me so I was more than happy to make that change to the pattern before cutting any fabric. Somehow, figuring out which size I wanted to cut took me so much longer than usual as I was having a complete mental block on the fact that the measurements were only in cm!

I then went ahead and cut out the fabric and stitched up the top. I foolishly didn’t do any fitting as I was going as the loose flowy style of the garment seemed like it couldn’t really cause too many problems. The top came together really easily and there are some lovely finishing touches like the bias bound neckline and the slit in the upper back with a hook and eye closure so I had a lot of fun constructing the garment.

However, when I went to try it on I realized that the fit was not at all good! Strangely for me, the front fits me almost perfectly,  but it was the back where all the problems were. For starters, it was way too big – so much so that the hook and eye just won’t stay closed as there is no tension holding it. It gapes quite a lot where the back slit is and sags down quite a lot at the centre back with the weight of the gathered tier.

I found that taking photographs from each side is a really good way to assess the fit issues objectively. With a photograph, I can look at the garment and think about the problem areas without focussing on my body – which inevitably happens when you look in the mirror. Definitely, a fit hack I would recommend to everyone!

I started pinning out the excess and took 2inches out of the back width! Only then did the top start to sit a bit better on me. I actually took out the width from the centre of the shoulder seams all the way down to the bottom of the back bodice piece. You can see from the pictures that the shoulder seams are hanging over my shoulders by quite a way so this seemed like a good way to reduce both the back width and take some of that length out of the shoulder seams too.

To make this adjustment on the pattern I just cut the back bodice right down the entire length and overlapped by 1″ (2″ total removed across the whole back). To make the corresponding change to the front shoulder seam I did a narrow shoulder adjustment using the slash and spread method shown here. I took 1″ out at just the shoulder seam as I didn’t want to change the fit across the bust at all.

I was also finding I had very restricted movement in my arms as the underarm was really too low for me. To fix that I followed this video tutorial to lift the armscye by half an inch on the front and back bodice. This involved a corresponding change of 1″ on the sleeves.

So to summarize the fit issues and solutions I found for my first top:

  • narrow back – remove 1″ from back bodice vertically from the centre shoulder to bottom of the bodice
  • narrow shoulder – slash and overlap front shoulder by 1″ (front only)
  • restricted arm movement – raise armscye by half an inch on the bodice and 1″ on sleeves

Version 2: Another top length in green/black twill

After pinning out all these changes on my top and transferring them to the pattern I was hoping that my second version would be a success. I whipped up another top in the same fabric and this one was in fact wearable!

(Ignore the raincoat hung over the door – we had a bit of a downpour earlier and had run out of space to dry things!)

Looking at my photographs I could see the shoulders were sitting better and there was less gaping at the back. The horizontal lines were also sitting better but there is still some dragging down at the back.

I decided to wear this one around the house for a little while too, just to see how it was comfort-wise and if there were any areas I felt restricted. The top stayed on well and the hook and eye closure wasn’t falling open. It still pulls down a little at the back but not anywhere near as bad as before. I have a much bigger range of motion in my arms and overall the fit is a lot better. However, after my successes with the alterations, I decided I could make it even better as it was still not perfect.

Again I started pinching and pinning and looking as objectively as I could at the fit of the garment. I decided the back neckline was still a bit too loose and pinched out 2cm from each side (For this part of the fitting my brain had switched to metric so apologies for the change in measurements but I want to share everything as I did it). To transfer this to the pattern I added some darts to the back bodice neckline. I also narrowed the centreback some more by cutting the entire length of the bodice about 1 cm in from the centre back and overlapping it by 1.7cm

I then shifted my attention to the front. Although at first glance the fit seemed fine there was definitely some fine-tuning to be done. Now the shoulder was fitting properly it seemed like the front armscye was protruding past my arm socket so I pinched that out by 1.4 cm. To transfer this to the pattern I actually undid the narrow shoulder adjustment from the previous version. I then did an L shaped slash and spread from the centre of the shoulder seam to the bottom third of the armscye and moved this in by the 1.4 cm I had pinched out. I then readjusted the shoulder seam using the slash and spread method as before to be the same length as the back (approx 1cm smaller).

I also noticed the position of the shoulder seam was not right on my body. It was fine at the shoulder but angled toward the back of my neck so I marked my preferred position with pins. To make this change on the pattern I simply cut off a wedge from the front bodice at the shoulder corresponding to the line I marked on the top and stuck it onto the back bodice piece. (This step was particularly aided by the absence of seam allowances on the Fibre mood patterns – I imagine it could be trickier if you had to measure out where all the sewing lines were).

Finally, I decided the sleeves were quite wide (this was a style preference and nothing to do with the fit so I narrowed them by 1.4cm.

So to summarize the fit issues and solutions I found for my second top:

  • narrow back neckline- add darts to back neckline, 2cm width at neckline and approximately 6 cm in length angled toward the fullest part of the shoulder blade
  • narrow at centre back – remove 1.7cm from the full length of the back bodice
  • narrow front armscye – L shaped slash from centre shoulder to lower third of armscye. Overlap by 1.4cm (readjust narrow shoulder from the previous toile to accommodate this)
  • change line of shoulder seam by removing a wedge from the front bodice and adding it to the back bodice
  • narrow sleeves by 1.4cm

Version 3: Dress length in blue viscose twill

With all of my changes transferred to the pattern, I set out to make what I hoped would be my final version. I sewed up the bodice and had a quick try on to check I was happy with the fit. It seemed perfect so I decided to go for it and make this version into a dress.

From a lot of the pictures I’ve seen this dress comes up very short – which is not something I’d wear so I decided to go cautiously and add 1.5″ to the length of the first tier and tried it on. I then measured the length for the second tier (I went with 12.5″) to have the dress finish at knee length. As I was adding the second tier I decided to take out some of the fullness (approximately 8 inches) as it seemed like it was going to be very extra(!) and seeing as this style was already outside of my comfort zone I didn’t want to push it too far.

I am really pleased with the dress – it is perfect for summer. It is so light and breezy but I don’t feel like I have lots of skin on show which is my usual problem with summer clothes. It’s definitely a new style for me but I am pretty smitten and this colour is perfect. I often struggle to add anything bright to my wardrobe and when I do it is inevitably blue but when it makes me this happy I guess I’d be a fool not to!

If I had to pick fault with this final version I’d say I have narrowed the sleeves a bit too much and it feels a little tight on my biceps but that is such a minor thing compared to the changes I’ve made.

It has certainly been an experiencing getting this dress to fit but I would definitely say its been worth it – I’ve got a beautiful dress and I’ve learnt a lot along the way!

To anyone who has stuck with me this far – thank you. I hope this post has been interesting/useful for you. I’d love to hear how you’ve got on with the Fibre Mood patterns – I really like some of the other patterns but I’m concerned they will all need this much work!

Helen

 

 

ps. if you want to keep up with all my latest makes why not follow me on Instagram!

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Sewing a Penny dress with Lisa Comfort's cotton lawn

Sewing a Penny dress with Lisa Comfort’s cotton lawn

Sewing a Penny dress with Lisa Comfort's cotton lawn

When Minerva Crafts offered me the chance to review Lisa Comfort’s new fabric range I leapt at the chance. I absolutely love all of her ‘Sew Over It’ patterns and so to be able to make one of her patterns in a fabric she designed seemed like the perfect opportunity. The hardest part was choosing which colour and print to use and finding the perfect pattern to pair it with! The fabric is a lightweight cotton lawn and is available in a range of prints and colour ways. Given the scorching hot summer we have had I decided that I needed a nice loose fitting dress to match the breezy cotton lawn fabric. The Sew Over It Penny dress and Lisa Comfort’s cotton lawn in navy Elderflower print* looked like a winning combination! To read my fabric review and see all of my pictures of this gorgeous dress head on over to the Minerva crafts blog!

Sewing a Penny dress with Lisa Comfort's cotton lawn
The details:

Pattern: Sew Over It Penny dress*

Fabric: Lisa Comfort’s cotton lawn in navy Elderflower print*

Notions: Buttons, elastic

Alterations: Altered skirt to bea loose fitting straight skirt insteadof a semi-circle (read the blog post to find out more)

 

Don’t forget to read the full blog post on the Minerva crafts blog!

Want to keep up to date with everything that is new at HsHandcrafts including lots of great offers and freebies? Sign Up to my newsletter here!

 

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Sew Over It Penny dress and Lisa Comfort Cotton lawn

See all the details of my sew over it penny dress - made in lisa comfort cotton lawnPairing Lisa Comfort's fabric with the Sew Over It Penny dress patternPairing Lisa Comfort's fabric with the Sew Over It Penny dress patternLisa Comfort Cotton lawn and the Sew Over It Penny dress

(Link has a * next to it? That’s an affiliate or referral link. Full disclosure: I get a small commission if you buy via this link but I will only send you to products I truly think are worth it!).

Sewing the Joni dress by Tilly and the Buttons

Sewing the Joni dress by Tilly and the Buttons

I have a new post on the Minerva crafts blog ! Here’s a quick summary but be sure to read the full post here.

As many of you will know already, I love to sew with knit fabrics! and so when Minerva Crafts sent me some of their gorgeous spandex stretch jersey* to review I was delighted and couldn’t wait to get sewing! 

Sewing the Joni dress by Tilly and the Buttons

With the two recent book releases from Wendy Ward* and Tilly and the Buttons* both dedicated to sewing with knits I had plenty choice of patterns. This time, I chose to make the Joni dress from Tilly and the Buttons’ book – Stretch! Make Yourself Comfortable Sewing with Knit Fabrics*.

Sewing the Joni dress by Tilly and the Buttons

You can read about how I got on with the fabric and see more pictures of my dress over on the Minerva Crafts blog.

Sewing the Joni dress by Tilly and the Buttons

The details:

Pattern: Joni dress from Tilly and the Buttons’ book – Stretch! Make Yourself Comfortable Sewing with Knit Fabrics*

Fabric: spandex stretch jersey from Minerva Crafts*

Notions: 5mm Elastic

Alterations: Size 3 – small amount of extra room added to bust (approx 5mm)

Sewing the Joni dress by Tilly and the Buttons

I think my Joni dress is my new favourite make (the newest is always my favourite!). I loved making it so much that I think I will have to buy some more of this fabric in a few different colours to make some more!

Want to keep up to date with everything that is new at HsHandcrafts including lots of great offers and freebies? Sign Up to my newsletter here!

Sewing the Joni dress by Tilly and the Buttons

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Sewing the Joni dress by Tilly and the Buttons

Sewing the Joni dress by Tilly and the ButtonsSewing the Joni dress by Tilly and the ButtonsSewing the Joni dress by Tilly and the Buttons

(Link has a * next to it? That’s an affiliate or referral link. Full disclosure: I get a small commission if you buy via this link but I will only send you to products I truly think are worth it!).

Sewing trousers that actually fit!

How I made my first pair of trousers that actually fit!

Making causal trouser that actually fit might seem like a daunting challenge but I decided to give it a go! Find out how I got on…

Casual Trousers that fit well

For some reason I’ve always had troubles finding trouser that fit. For this reason I have generally become the sort of person that pretty much only wears skirts and dresses. I have made some trousers before, including my ginger jeans but I was never happy with the fit. However, over the past few months I have realised that my wardrobe really is missing some trousers – so i decided to start easy with a loose fitting pair from the Fashion with Fabric book* from the great British Sewing Bee. The pattern is actually for a jumpsuit but there is a suggested hack in the book of how to sew them into trousers.

Casual Trousers

How I made my first pair of trousers that actually fit!

As trouser fitting is not really my thing – I didn’t know where to start or what I was really looking for to help me fit as I sew so I decided to make a toile. I traced off the size 10 cut out my fabric and basted together the trousers and tried them on.

The fit wasn’t actually that terrible but I knew it could be better. So I set to work on figuring out what I could change.

I found a cool ebook on trouser fitting from Closet Case Patterns which was really useful. There were pictures of diagnostics for common fitting issues and how to fix them. I decided to only make small tweaks and so only added or took away a 1/4 inch in each case.

Jumpsuit Trousers from Fashion with Fabric

Trouser fitting adjustments

In the end the changes I made to my pattern pieces were many:

I scooped out the front crotch curve by 1/4inch (round pubis adjustment), I added a1/4 inch to the abdomen area and let of the front inseam by 1/4 inch (full tummy adjustment) and I added a quarter inch to the back seat curve (full seat adjustment).

I think for a tighter fitting trouser I would also need to deal with a gaping back but as these trousers have an elasticated waist I felt I could let that one slide for now!

Sewing Comfy trousers

The details:

Pattern: Jumpsuit Trousers Hack from Fashion with Fabric*

Fabric: lightweight cotton (possibly rayon?) from the man outside Sainsburys

Notions: Drawstring cord

Alterations: Size 10, round pubis adjustment, full tummy adjustmentfull seat adjustment.

Jumping for Joy at Trousers that actually fit!

I am so pleased to finally have a pair of me-made trousers that fit well! The fabric is really comfy and over the summer with all the hot weather we have been having they have been fantastic!

If you liked this overview of my project why not keep up to date with my current makes over on Instagram

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Making trousers that actually fit - Pin Me

How I made casual trousers that fitMe-Made-may 2018A pIR OF TROUSERS THAT ACTUALLY FITS

(Link has a * next to it? That’s an affiliate or referral link. Full disclosure: I get a small commission if you buy via this link but I will only send you to products I truly think are worth it!).

Campanula Hat Knitting Pattern from HsHandcrafts

Campanula Hat: A new colourwork knitting pattern

Hi everyone!

I know I’ve been a bit quiet on the knitting front lately but I promise you this one is worth the wait!

I’ve got a new knitting pattern for you!

Campanula Hat Knitting Pattern from HsHandcraftsThe Campanula HAT

Campanula is a new colour work knitting pattern to create a fun and quirky hat. You can change the colours to suit any personality. I started here with a traditional and stylish red, white, and blue colour combination but the fun combination of scallops and stripes mixes up this traditional combination and injects a load of fun into it!

Campanula Hat Knitting Pattern from HsHandcrafts

Knit in a bold colour combination this hat is sure to brighten up any grey day! Or why not try it in subtle natural shades for a sleek and stylish accessory to your winter wardrobe

Campanula Hat Knitting Pattern from HsHandcrafts

The design is easy to knit and only requires knowledge of:
long tail cast on
ribbing
colour work
decreases

Campanula Hat Knitting Pattern from HsHandcrafts

The hat is one size only and will fit an adult

It is knit in worsted weight yarn in three colours (less than 50 g of each) on size 3.5 mm circular needles.

Campanula Hat Knitting Pattern from HsHandcrafts

GIVE ME THE PATTERN!

If this doesn’t sound great enough already you can get this pattern for FREE! All you have to do is sign up for my mailing list and use the signup code HHKNIT and you will get your free pdf download of this fabulous knitting pattern delivered straight to your inbox!

Sign up for HsHandcrafts mailing list

Campanula Hat Knitting Pattern from HsHandcrafts

I’d love to see your version of the Campanula hat – why not create a project page over on Ravelry and tell the world what you thought about it – don’t forget to link to the pattern page so we can all find you!

I would also love it if you shared you knits on social media – don’t forget to tag me (@HsHandcrafts on Instagram, Facebook, and Twitter) so I can see your make and use the hashtag #hhcampanula so we can all have a good look! Don’t forget you can use the hashtag #hshandcrafts to show off all your makes using any HsHandcrafts pattern too – go on don’t be shy!

Campanula Hat Knitting Pattern from HsHandcrafts

freehatknittingpatternDownload your free knitting pattern - Campanula Hat Knitting Pattern from HsHandcraftsFree download - Campanula Hat Knitting Pattern from HsHandcrafts
Phoebe dress by HsHandcrafts

Phoebe Dress Review – pattern from Sew Over It

The Phoebe dress from Sew Over It was released as part of the pdf club last year and I immediately snapped it up as a great option for work wear. As it is made with knit fabric it is also secretly super comfy. However, I didn’t get around to making one for a long time, partly due to having so many other things to make and partly because the fabric requirements had me stumped for quite some time – two different weights of knit fabric to be used together in the same outfit.

The pattern called for a metre each of a heavy weight knit for the skirt and a lighter weight drapy knit for the top. Once I had completed the intro to kits course from Sew Over It and I was a bit more comfortable with sewing with knits I felt more ready to make my selection. In fact, I had a metre of the Ponte used for my Emma dress left over. I picked a soft blue jersey from Girl Charlee to use for the top and got started!.

 

Phoebe Dress Review – pattern from Sew Over It

I actually really like this pattern – I love a pencil skirt but often find that when I tuck in a top I get horrible bulges around the waistline, particularly towards the end of the day when all my careful tucking has ridden up and scrunched around my waist (not pretty at all). This pattern removes that problem entirely by creating the illusion of a top neatly tucked in to a pencil skirt without any tucking in at all! In fact the gathering at the front makes it look like you have miraculously managed to get your top evenly spaced around your skirt in beautiful gathers!

Keyhole neckline

One feature that makes this pattern stand out for me is the keyhole neck feature on the back. I think without this the pattern would be rather simple and not really that notable but this neck feature is a nice finishing touch and makes it feel like a slightly more advanced make.

I found the sizing of the Phoebe dress to be pretty good for me. Like all Sew Over It  patterns I chose to make a size down compared to that given by the measurements as I generally find them to be a bit roomier than I would like and I think given the fitted style of this skirt that was a good choice. The loose fitting top means there was no need even for an FBA (full bust adjustment) which is pretty much a staple adjustment for me so it gets bonus points from me there – however, if you don’t have a full bust I would maybe choose to down size for the top.

 

The details:

Pattern: Phoebe dress from Sew Over It

Fabric: Dark blue Ponte de Roma and light blue jersey – both from Girl Charlee UK

Notions: A small blue button from stash for the keyhole closure, Gutermann thread

Alterations: None! (there’s a first time for everything)

I do really like the Phoebe dress pattern and think it will prove quite versatile. I probably could have chosen a drapier fabric for the top but I’m still not quite sure what I am looking for there.

My only reservation about this pattern is that whilst there are many advantages to it looking like separates whilst actually being a one-piece you don’t get the one benefit of being able to wash them separately

If you liked this overview of my project why not keep up to date with my current makes over on instagram

HsHandcrafts Phoebe Dress

 

Veronica hat by hshandcrafts geometric colourwork motif

A new hat pattern – test knitters required

Over the last few weeks I have been hard at work developing a new hat knitting pattern.

Meet Veronica – a fun yet simple knit in a cosy aran or worsted weight yarn with a modern geometric motif created in colour work. The hat is worked in two colours; a solid background colour with a bright contrast for the geometric pattern.

Veronica hat from hshandcrafts

Knit in 100% wool it is a snug and warm beanie to keep the wind out on the coldest of winter days!

It is quite easy knitting and only requires knowledge of:
long tail cast on
ribbing
colourwork
decreases

The hat is one size only and will fit an adult

It is knit in aran weight yarn in two different colours (less than 50g of each) on 4mm circular needles.

 

Test knitters required

The pattern is available now on Ravelry but this pattern is currently being tested – please be aware there may be some small errors. Any purchases before testing is complete will be updated with the finished pattern once available.

Speaking of testing, if you would like to help me out and get the pattern for free in exchange you can sign up to test knit this pattern here. I would love it if you could knit a version for me!

I really hope you all love this new pattern as much as I do and I cant wait to see your versions!

Don’t forget you can tag any of your makes with #hshandcrafts and I would love to see your Veronica hats too – just use the tag #hhveronica

 

Wedding Season

New to Me” week has just drawn to a close on the Monthly Stitch and there were so many fantastic entries, which means I am so flattered that mine was picked as a finalist! You can read my post here, or go and see it over on the Monthly stitch. I would be so grateful if you wanted to go and vote for it too – and you should definitely go and check out the other entries, I am sure I will be buying up a few more indie patterns after seeing all of those fantastic makes!

 

 

 

 

 

 

With wedding season fast approaching I needed the perfect guest outfit for my Aunty’s upcoming nuptials. The wedding will be at the beginning of August and it is an outside affair. I needed the perfect dress – fancy yet not too flamboyant, summery yet amenable to the British weather!

After scouring the list of indie designers so kindly provided on this blog I set my heart on the Georgia dress from By Hand London. Having never used one of their patterns before I had no idea what to expect. As it turns out they give plenty of direction and there is even an online sew-along with more helpful tips.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

However, once I had read the instructions and looked at the pattern pieces I realised where my first problem would lie. That bodice. With the bodice made up of 5 separate pieces a full bust adjustment was not going to be easy and it was pretty obvious I was going to need a full bust adjustment looking at the size of the pattern pieces. This is where the sew-along came into its own. There were plenty of detailed instructions with photographs about what was required. So I followed the instructions and added a 1 inch wedge into the centre of each of the front bodice centre and side pieces and made a toile. It was not good! There was no way I was going to be decent with that bodice on a dress! – So I took matters into my own hands. The circumference of the bodice was fine, it was just the height, which the FBA described in the sew-along had not accounted for at all. I slashed all the bodice pieces in half horizontally and added another inch of height.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Once I had figured out these changes to the bodice the rest was fairly plain sailing. The pattern recommended medium weight fabrics with a little bit of stretch but having looked at some pictures of others I wanted to use a slightly heavier fabric (to hide a multitude of sins on such a fitted dress!). I went with this gorgeous stripy jacquard from Fabworks. It’s pretty heavy for a dressmaking fabric and it frays constantly – my floor looked like I’d attacked the fabric with a shredder when I’d finished but the colours are amazing, a royal blue with stripes of pink, mint green and white running through it.

The details:

Pattern: By Hand London – Georgia dress

Fabric: Blue Jacquard from Fabworks

Alterations: Size 8 bodice with a one inch FBA and an extra inch of height added. Skirt is graded from a size 8 at the bodice to a 12 at the waist and a 14 at the hips

 

I probably could have afforded to go down a size at the hips but for a first go at this pattern I am pretty pleased with it. There are still some fit issues on the bodice but for a first attempt at a pattern from a new-to-me designer I am pretty pleased!

Helen

If you liked this overview of my project why not keep up to date with my current makes over on Instagram or on my blog

My new go-to

It’s Indie Pattern Month over on the Monthly Stitch and there are loads of great things to see, interviews with indie designers, discount codes, competitions and best of all lots of amazing sewers making indie patterns! Last week for the first week of Indie Pattern Month the theme was dresses and there were some amazing winners. I submitted my most recent Heather dress from Sew Over It. You can read about it over on the Monthly stitch or find the post below:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Don’t you just love it when you find a pattern that is perfect for you? Be it the style, the fit, or just how fun/easy it is to make. I am so pleased that I have recently found one of those patterns. As soon as the Heather dress by Sew Over It was released, I just knew I had to make it!

 

My first effort was a straight out of the envelope size 10 and it was a pretty good start. Once made I just had to nip a bit out of the back seams so that it wasn’t really baggy. However, just one wasn’t enough and so on my second version I made a few extra changes. I took a couple of inches out of each of those back seams as well as an inch off the waist at each side seam. I also added a bit of extra room into the bust by just curving those princess seams a to have an extra quarter inch. In order to make this dress different from the first I took 5 whole inches off the length! (Sometimes it pays to be short, you can really play around with the length of things!

For Indie Pattern Month, I have made my third version of this dress. This has pretty much the same alterations as the first, but this time the length is somewhere in between (only 3 inches off the pattern this time!) I also added an extra quarter inch to the bust (making that a total of 1/2 an inch on each seam). I really love the dress and can see myself getting a lot of wear out of it.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

For those that follow me on Instagram you will be well aware that I love anything blue and so this definitely fits in with my wardrobe! I really love that it is made from a knit fabric as it makes it so comfortable for everyday wear but it doesn’t look to obviously like secret pyjamas due to the way the fabric holds its shape. I always love a good Ponte de Roma and this one is no exception. It has a lovely feel to it and the pattern is super fun yet not too in you face (even if I do now match my curtains!!) I bought it at the Knitting and Stitching show back in spring at the London Olympia from Guthrie and Ghani and have been waiting for the perfect time to cut into it.

The pattern is pretty easy to follow. I got a bit confused the first time around the pockets but if you take your time and follow the instructions there is absolutely nothing to worry about as it is so well described.

The details:

Pattern: Sew Over It – Heather dress

Fabric: Blue diamonds Ponte de Roma from Guthrie and Ghani

Alterations: Size ten, 1/2in added to the bust on each princess seam, 1 inch taken out of each side of both back seams, 1/2in pinched out of each side seam at the waist, hem raised by 3 inches.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Sew Over It has always been one of my favourite Indie designers and the Heather dress is just another great pattern from them. I already have three but I can definitely see many more in my future!

If you liked this overview of my project why not keep up to date with my current makes over on Instagramon Instagram

Ginger Jeans

wp-1490528477313.jpgWay back in 2014 when the internet first went crazy for Ginger jeans I had not even begun to sew! Once I started making my own clothes, however, it quickly became apparent that these were definitely a benchmark project. It almost felt like there was some sort of secret guild of dressmakers that you would be allowed into once you had constructed your first pair.

So here we are two years into my dressmaking journey and I have made my first pair of jeans! They may not be perfect, but I love them! I love that they more or less fit, I love that they have wobbly top stitching and I love that they have secret sunshine in the pockets!

Never in my life have I owned a pair of jeans that fit. Generally, in order to squeeze my bum into them, they have to gape massively at the waist, so when I took my measurements and compared them to the packet I was completely baffled that I came out as a straight size ten on all measurements! So I went ahead and cut it out that way. However, when I had basted them together and had my first try, sure enough, there was gaping at the waist. This was when I went to the amazing Closet Case Files Sewalong for much-needed advice!

wp-1490528462707.jpgI took a wedge out of each yoke – around 3cm at the waist tapering to nothing at the bottom edge. I tried on again and the fit was so much better I decided to stop there, despite plenty room for improvement. On my next pair, I think I will attempt to make the crotch seam a little longer and possibly take some width out of the thighs but compared to anything I have worn before these are so much better! I did alter the length (by 3.5 inches!!!) but for me, that goes without saying.

I really enjoyed the construction of these jeans – it felt much more like construction than any other project I have completed) I think that comes from the rigidity of the denim and the many smaller fabric pieces than you get for dresses or skirts. I also really enjoyed that I had to take it slow – especially to keep swapping from my blue normal thread to the thicker yellow topstitching.

The details:

Pattern: High waisted view of Ginger Jeans from Closet Case Files

Fabric: Stretch Denim from somewhere on ebay

Notions: 8 inch denim zip, Guterman jeans cotton thread and topstitching thread, rivets and jeans button from ebay

Alterations: Dart out of yoke and shortened leg

So now I have made jeans I feel like I can graduate from my personal dressmaking school and am ready to take on anything in my new jeans!

If you liked this overview of my project why not keep up to date with my current makes (hint, there’s another Moneta on the go at the moment!!) over on instagram