Chuck Jumper

 

NEWSFLASH: I have a new favourite thing!

Chuck JumperI absolutely love this jumper. It took me just about 2 months to knit and I loved every minute of it! The yarn is lovely, the pattern is lovely, the jumper is lovely. I just want to curl up in it forever!

Ok so I think you get the picture that I really like this jumper! Let me tell you a bit more about it. It is the chuck jumper pattern by Andi Satterlund but made into a full length version instead of the cropped version featured in the pattern. It is in a lovely navy wool and it is super warm and cosy!

New Skill alert

After having knit only about 30 stitches of this sweater I came across my first new skill requirement – short rows. After a bit of googling I found a great tutorial on Purl Soho, and it turns out it really is as simple as it sounds. You just knit a short row , so don’t knit all the way to the end and then turn around and come back. Well, actually before turning you have to wrap the yarn around the next stitch but this is super easy and stops big gaps from forming in your knitting.

e2016-04-05 17.41.31

After overcoming this first challenge I thought it would be smooth sailing from there on in. This was only my second knitted garment but it was from the same designer as my first one: Miette. However, whilst the basic construction was pretty simple I hadn’t factored in the cables. Don’t get me wrong, I did practice cables first on my hat before jumping straight in to a jumper covered in them but what was complicated was the way the repeats of the cables didn’t really match up and the pattern for the cabling was written separately to the pattern for the jumper. so there was lots of jumping around the pattern trying to find “stitch pattern 2” and then remember what row I was up to on each stitch pattern. Surely there’s an app for this sort of thing? If any one knows about it I’d love to hear from you!

e2016-04-06 07.57.27

Unsure about the length of the jumper I decided to stop knitting the body before I reached the bottom band and transferred the stitches onto scrap yarn. The length was perfectly fine as a cropped jumper but I thought it  might be quite fun to try and adapt the pattern to make it longer. However, I was unsure if I would have enough yarn, so wanted to knit the sleeves first.

e2016-03-29 08.29.24

The next new skill came when I began on the sleeves and the construction required a sleeve-cap. The instructions were to pick up the stitches around the armhole and then knit from the armpit to the top of the sleeve. Then using short rows gradually construct the sleeve cap by making each row one stitches longer than the previous. The instructions were so clear I had a sleeve-cap before I had even realised what I was doing!

e2016-04-06 07.57.16

Once the sleeves were done I still had three balls of yarn left so I decided to go ahead and lengthen the jumper. This was where the fun kicked in! As some of you may be aware I am a bit of a maths geek so I relished the opportunity to get a notepad up and do some sums. But that’s another post entirely so if you want to learn more about how I went adjusting this pattern to make the jumper full length keep your eyes peeled over the next few days.

The details:

Pattern: Chuck by Andi Satterlund

Yarn: Drops Nepal in Navy Blue

Needles: Drops Pro circular needles 4.5mm

Alterations: I lengthened the pattern to become full length instead of cropped – more details to follow

The yarn is so warm as it is 65% wool and 35% alpaca it is not too soft but this is not too much of a problem as I always wear a t-shirt under my jumpers. It was really nice to knit with and slid well along the needles and did not split very easily. Although my lovely metal needles are now a bit tarnished probably due to the rough nature of the yarn.

The pattern was easy to follow if a little annoying to have to jump back and forth between the garment instructions and the cable pattern but I guess this comes with the territory of cables. Once I had done the cable repeat once this wasn’t too bad as I had a rough idea what was going on anyway!

e2016-03-29 08.28.33

I really like the cable design and think I did a pretty good job of them for a first proper attempt at cables other than my last hat. I especially like the twists that run down either side of the centre panel. The main cable design down the front is really good but I am not particularly neat at knitting single stitch cables yet. Maybe there is some special technique I am missing that stops these stitches looking looser than the rest. If anyone has any ideas I would love to hear them!

In case you hadnt noticed yet, I really love this jumper and think I will definitely get loads of wear out of it. I don’t want to say it but its a bit of a pity spring has arrived as it might have to be shelved until next winter – but for the moment I am getting as much use out of it as possible with a pair of cropped jeans and slip on pumps with no socks to keep my temperature in check!

If you want to read some more of my notes on this pattern, what I thought about the yarn and for a sneak peak on how I lengthened the pattern you can check out my project page on Ravelry

Advertisements

Leftovers hat

Leftovers Hat on HsHandcraftsHaving finished my Miette cardigan I still had 2 skeins of Drops Paris yarn left to use. I really loved the colour and loved knitting with it as it just glided along the needles. I wasn’t ready to surrender those last 2 skeins to my stash never to be seen again so I decided to use them right away. After scouring Ravelry for a project that would work nicely with this amount of yarn I decided to go for a hat.

 

Cabling – not as tricky as I thought

I have always loved cabling on knitted items but as yet have not attempted it. Anything that looks that great has got to be tricky, right? Wrong! I bought a cable needle (amongst a lot of other things) from Abakhan in the January sales and decided that now was the perfect time to learn. I had some great yarn that I loved working with so I thought I would give it a try.

cable hook

I found a pattern for a basic hat with a little bit of cable detail and got to work.

After some Googling to find out what CR and CL meant I discovered that it is really very simple! You actually just slip some stitches onto the cable needle and hold it either in front or behind whilst you work some more stitches before knitting those that are on the cable needle. Simple!

cable hat

The hat came together really quickly. It only took a couple of evenings in fact. I think I am actually in love with this yarn, it is so quick to knit and despite being aran weight it is not too heavy as it is 100% cotton.

The details:

Pattern: A hat fit for a fella by Shana Schasteen

Yarn: Drops Paris in Petrol

Needles:Drops Pro 5mm

Alterations: I actually did the repeat one stitch narrower than the pattern and squeezed in an extra half a repeat but this was entirely accidental and makes very little difference to the finished thing.

closeup hat

I am so glad I chase to make this hat straight away because I would hate to have let that yarn go to waste and now I have a hat to wear in the winter and a cardigan to wear in the summer so that I can enjoy the yarn all year long!

If you liked this overview of my project why not keep up to date with my current goings on over on Twitter!