Calling all sock knitters…

 

I know a lot of people love to knit socks. It is never something I have had any desire to try before. The thought of spending time creating something beautiful that is going to sit on my feet just bemuses me! However, I am willing to be converted. What is it about sock knitting that is so great?

Why should I knit socks?

Convince me. If you had to give me one good reason what would it be?

I have many reasons why it doesn’t appeal to me, but maybe I am wrong.

  1. They are going to go on my feet/
  2. No one will see them – I want to be able to admire my knitting when I wear it
  3. They look small and fiddly to knit.
  4. I don’t like double pointed needles – they are way too faffy
  5. Once you have the elation of having finished one (YAY!) You have to start right over again and knit the next one.

I could go on, but I feel like that is enough reasons.

However, if you want to convince me I would be willing to give it a try. Who knows, I could be converted to becoming a sock knitter. If you were me which pattern would you start with for socks?

You could even send me a link to your most fabulous knitted socks to try and convince me! Find me on Ravelry here and share your makes with me!

Avena Cowl

 

You may remember some time ago I shared with you the cowl I made my mum for her birthday. Well, I have eventually written up the pattern I created and it is available for you to download and make for yourself for free from Ravelry!


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How to name a pattern

Strangely enough the trickiest part of making this patternwas not writing the pattern itself – in fact its a pretty simple knit – but instead was coming up with a name. I always find it quite strange how so many patterns are named with girls names (I think this is more common for sewing patterns but it’s certainly still there for knitting and crochet). I obviously decided I wanted to be different and so rather than pick a girls name for my pattern I toyed with a few different ideas. Firstly I thought about place names and was all set to name this the Silverdale cowl after a little village near where my parents live but then after some searching on Ravelry I found that this two was pretty common. Instead I decided to combine two of my passions and go with plant names! and not just any pants either – I wanted to at least start with agricultural weeds – which is the thing I work on.

So here you have the Avena cowl. Avena is the generic name for oats. In particular this cowl is in tribute to wild oats and their beautiful long awned seeds. the stripes in the cowl just brought them to mind. So there you have it a beautiful cowl named after an agricultural weed – who would have thought it!2015-11-19 21.08.54

The details

Any way, enough about names. I’m sure you want to hear about the cowl itself. Avena is  an elegant cowl, with a full twist and alternating stripes of colour.

This cowl is perfect for the spring or Autumn and can be worked in any colour combinations whether two shades of the same colour for elegant style or contrasting colours for a fun addition to any outfit!

The cowl is worked in the round with a full twist to create a Möbius strip. This gives a great effect showing off both sides of the knitting.

Gauge is not particularly important and the number of stitches cast on can be easily adjusted to accommodate different sizes.2015-11-19 21.04.43

So I’d love to hear your thoughts on this pattern – any comments you have would be great or better still if you make one yourself I would love to see the pictures!!

Head on over to Ravelry to check out the pattern or go to my pattern page to find more of my patterns.

Catching up

I am back from my holiday and had a lovely break, I even managed to get a little bit of knitting done but our time was mostly spent doing other fun things so there’s not really much to show. I doubt I will have much time this week either as its always the same after a holiday when you have to catch up on all the emails you’ve missed whilst you were away and remember how to do stupid things like write again!

So not much to share really but thought I would check in and let you know what I’ve got in store now that I’m back: finishing off my current sewing project using these fun buttons, a new sewing pattern to make from English Girl at Home, and a rush job finishing my knitted shawl if I want it to be ready to wear for my friends wedding at the beginning of August!

Wow, what a list! Not sure I’ll manage it all within the time-frame of my self-imposed deadlines but here’s to trying!

H.

Waterfall Clemence

Waterfall Skirt

After all that blogging about knitting and crochet last week I was really excited to get on with some sewing last weekend so I made a good start on the next item on my ‘to-sew’ list. It was the Clemence skirt from the Tilly and the Buttons’ book. I have seen a few of these popping up all over blog loand for a while now and each one is so different so I couldnt wait to put my own spin on it!

Waterfall skirt using Clemence pattern

One really great thing that I loved about making this skirt is you actually get to make your own pattern! This sounds really daunting at first but it turns out all you need is a few rectangles! You only even really need your waist measurement but your hip measurement can help get the fullness of the skirt more to your liking. It is a simple waistband cut twice and then a front piece cut on the fold and two back pieces. The length of the rectangles is simply your desired skirt length and the width is determined by some mathmatical trickery concerning your waist measurment. Although I did decided to make the width of my skirt panels a bit narrower to give a less full skirt.

Clemence pattern

I chose to make a midi skirt that would sit just a bit below the knee. However, it is now much longer than this on me as it sits quite a bit lower on my waist than I had hoped. I think I might have stretched the fabric slightly as I sewed the waistband. I thought about shortening it before hemming but I decided I actually really like this length so decided to stick with it!

The details:

Pattern: Clemence skirt from Tilly and the Buttons book: Love at first stitch

Fabric: Waterfall print quiliting cotton (unknown make) bought from Fashion Fabrics in st. Albans

Notions: YKK invisible zip in cream, Guterman thread in grey, lightweight interfacing.

Alterations: Midi length, reduced fullness from recomendation by taking 3.5 inches off the width of each pattern piece

I really love this skirt, infact I dont think theres much that I am disappointed with. The waist does not sit exactly where I planned but I am still happy with it. I was so happy that the sunny weather cam back yesterday so I got a chance to wear it straight away. In fact 4 separate people complemented me on it (yes 4!…cue smug face) and I even got asked where I had bought it from!

I think this is one I will definitely be making again!

H.

Free Pattern: Andalusian Boot Cuffs

I have some exciting news!

If you liked the look of my boot cuffs that I made in my previous post you will be delighted to hear that the pattern is now available to download for FREE on here on Ravelry!

I would love any feedback anyone has on this pattern as it is my first attempt at publishing and I’m sure there will be some mistakes. I have tried to keep it simple though and as I explained in my last post the boot cuffs are a simple make and are knitted flat.

Perhaps you could make them as a mothers day gift (UK mothers day is on the 12th March in case you were wondering!)

I hope you enjoy this pattern.

H.