Applique Tote Bag Tutorial

I am really excited to share with you a tutorial I made for Minerva Crafts. Their website is really great with loads of great tutorials to try. I created a tote bag with appliqued letters and you can too following the instructions on their site.

It is a really simple make and you can customize it anyway you like with your choice of letters or shapes in any combination of colours.

To make this bag, as it appears in the tutorial, for yourself you will need the following supplies:

Canvas

Webbing

quilting cotton 1

quilting cotton 2

quilting cotton 3

quilting cotton 4

fusible bondaweb

contrast thread

You can make your own tote bag just like mine. Just follow the directions here. Be sure to let me know if you make one – I’d love to see it!

This post contains affiliate links. All opinions are my own.

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How To: Make a new ironing board cover

ironing board cover

Today I have a really quick post for a really quick make. In fact I did everything from cutting the fabric to the photo shoot all within 2 hours!

I decided it was time my ironing board got a makeover. Whilst visiting Ikea last week I discovered their great fabric range and just had to get some. This was the perfect choice for my ironing board. Look at that print!

 

Do It Yourself

What you will need:
  • Fikea fabricabric (Length needs to be the length of your ironing board + 30 cm, width needs to be the width of your ironing board +30 cm)
  • Elastic (length needs to be long enough to fit around your ironing board
  • Safety pin
  • Matching thread
To make this yourself follow these simple instructions:
  1. Trace around the top of your ironing board directly onto the back of the fabric.
  2.  Add 15 cm extra all the way around your ironing board and cut out the fabric
  3. ironingboard2Turn over 1.5 cm or 5/8 in all the way around the edge making small folds in the curved parts so as they lie flat.
  4. Turn the same amount under again, press and pin.
  5. Stitch as close as you can to the first fold to create a channel all the way around the edge. Be sure to leave a small gap of about 3 cm along the long edge.
  6. Attach a safety pin to the end of a long piece of elastic.
  7. Thread the saftey pin through the channel you have created.
  8. Place the cover over your ironing board and smooth out the top
  9. Pull the elastic tight until the cover wont move on your board.
  10. Tie the elastic tight and cut off any excess.

 

It’s such a quick make but can really spruce up your sewing space!

If you enjoyed this make why not try some of my other patterns!

KCBW6 Day 6: Polls Apart

Only 2 days left of KCBW6. I hope everyone is still having loads of fun!

Today is the day when you get to have your say rather than just listen to me rambling on and on!

I want to know what makes you want to read this blog? What do you want to see more of? As well as the poll itself which we will get to in just a minute I would love to hear your comments on the style of my posts, their length and what you think of the content. If there is anything you would like to see more of (or less of) jsut let me know. Today is your turn to speak!

So here’s my poll…I want to know what your favourite type of blog post to read is. You can tick more than one box if you just cant decide! Below the poll I have given some examples of my previous posts that fall into each category if you want to check them out!

I look forward to hearing what you think and hopefully, from now on,  I will be able to write more of the sort of posts you want to read

Seeing a work in progress

By this type of post I mean a post that describes a project I am working on right now but its not finished. The post could be just an update on how the project is going or a discussion about why it isn’t finished.

Examples of this type of post are:

Seeing a completed project

These types of post are basically a chance for you to see a porject I have finished. There will often be a roundup of the pattern and what I thought of it, including how easy it was to follow. I might also discuss the yarn I used and how well it worked with that project and any general comments about the construction or finished feel of the project.

Examples of this type of post are:

A tutorial on how to make something yourself

This could be an explanation of how to do a simple craft project or even how to do a complicated stitch pattern. I like to include these posts as I learn something new, especially if I have struggled to find a useful tutorial myself.

Examples of this type of post are:

Insights into how I choose my projects

By this I mean the sort of post detailing how my creative process works from the choice of yarn, colour or pattern.

Examples of this type of post are:

Random musings

This sort of post can be quite varied and covers everything from random crafting related thoughts that pop into my head to questions for you about how to fix a problem I’ve been having.

Examples of this type of post are:

embroidery floss necklace

embroidery floss necklace

It definitely feels like spring is here and all the flowers that are popping up everywhere make me want to brighten up my wardrobe. My winter wardrobe is often quite dark incorporating jewel tones such as the blue of my geometric cowl or the red of my delphine skirt, but spring calls for bright blues and pale yellows!

After taking the time to think about some of the great ideas I found when searching through my favourite pins I decided to have a go at making the embroidery floss necklace that I had pinned onto my craft board

Embroidery floss necklace

Embroidery floss necklace found on pinterest

I took the time to click through and find the original post which was actually on Mollie Makes and had some nice simple instructions.

I decided I wanted to make my necklace a little more discrete and so opted for only 24 threads instead of the suggested 137! I thought such a big change might really alter the style of the necklace but I ‘m really happy with how it turned out and I think if I had made it much bigger it would have looked a bit ridiculous on me.

Check out how it turned out and let me know what you think:

The final stage of making the necklace is to cut off the end. This gave me about a 20 cm length of all the embroidery threads. Of course I wasn’t going to through these away so I folded them into quarters to give me a 96 thread bunch and tied it up to make a tassle. I strung this onto a much longer piece of thread to make another necklace so nothing went to waste! You could also make it into a keyring if one brightly coloured embroidery floss necklace is enough for you!

tassle necklace made using the leftovers from my embroidery necklace

tassle necklace

To make your own:

You need

  • 6-10 skeins of embroidery floss
  • scissors

Find the instructions on Mollie Makes but if like me you want to change the thickness don’t be afraid as it seems to be quite easy to make this necklace your own!

H.

 

Mothers Day African Flower Keyring on hshandcrafts

African Flower Keyring

Happy Mothers Day!

I hope everyone has had a great day treating their mums (or being treated to lovely things). Unfortunately I live a long way away from my mum and so have been unable to do so but will get to see her in a couple of weeks so I am very excited for that.

As I didn’t get to see her today I sent her a little treat in the post which is why I have held back this post until today rather than publish it as soon as I had finished making it last week! I made an African flower keyring

I really like the African flower crochet motif but have not really been sure what to use it for. I often see them made up with double knitting, which despite looking lovely always seems to be too big a design for anything I would like to make.

So I decided instead to try making one out of embroidery floss and it worked a treat! African Flower Keyring

The finished hex is about 2inches across

African flower keyring

To make your own…

you will need:

  • embroidery floss in 5 colours
  • a keyring
  • 2 beads in colours of your choice
  • some wadding (1.5inches square)
  • a 2mm crochet hook
  • scissors

1. Crochet your African flowers

To start off you need to make 2xAfrican flower hexes or any other crochet hex would be great. I followed this picture tutorial

http://heidibearscreative.blogspot.co.uk/2010/05/african-flower-hexagon-crochet-tutorial.html

but…most importantly you need to use embroidery floss and a 2mm crochet hook to end up with your hex small enough to use as a key ring.

2. Begin to join the African flowers together

Place your two African flowers together with all the loose ends pointing inwards

Join your embroidery floss in a colour of your choosing (I used dark blue here) to one of the corners making sure to join the 2 African flowers together

Chain 1 and then single crochet in each gap between the double crochets from the previous round around three edges of your hex. At each corner put 3 single crochet into the chain space from the previous round.

3. Stuff the keyring

To make sure the key ring holds its shape you need to stuff it with some wadding or any kind of stiff fabric.

Cut this to a hexagon that will easily fit inside your crocheted hexes. (Mine was approximately 1 inch across)

Place your cut out shape in the gap between your 2 African flowers.

4. Continue joining the African flowers

Continue to single crochet all the way around the hexes with three single crochet in the chain space at each corner.

5. Join the round

Once you have crocheted all the way around and your 2 hexes are joined together complete the round with a slip stitch into the first single crochet.

6. Cut the embroidery floss

Be sure to leave a long tail to attach to your key ring

7. Add beads

Thread your beads onto the embroidery floss tail

8. Attach keyring

Thread the end of the embroidery floss through the loop on the keyring and tie it as close as possible to the beads.

9. Cut the embroidery floss

Leave enough of a tail so that the knot wont come untied but so that it still looks tidy.

Voila…your very own African flower keyring!

Have you made anything with the African flower motif recently? i would love to see your designs

H.

Front post double crochet (fpdc) and back post double crochet (bpdc)

After sharing with you my geometric crochet cowl I thought it might be quite nice to include a tutorial on how to do front- and back- post double crochets (abbreviated to fpdc/bpdc in patterns). These stitches are great ones for adding texture to crochet projects and can add a lot of depth to the finished project making it chunky and giving it some stretch.

I have added the tutorial with lots of photos to help guide you through but if anything is unclear feel free to pop a question in the comments section and i will try to clarify.

So there you have it front- and back-post double crochet. These stitches look great as they are and can help give your work some added depth and texture, or can be used to create some fantastic effects such as ribbing, basket-weave and cabling!

H.